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    An Post at Christmas
Edited and adapted by Bridget Haggerty

For well over a hundred years, there has been in the public mind a particularly close association between the Post Office and Christmas time. Christmas cards, letters from abroad, turkeys, geese and parcels of every description are happily linked with the image of a heavily-laden but cheerful postman. Despite great changes in technology in recent years, the link between Christmas and the Post Office survives and Santa Claus himself still depends on An Post to bring him the many thousands of letters written by children throughout the country.

How did all this begin? The connection with the Post Office goes back at least to the invention of Christmas cards and to Henry Cole who is credited with introducing them. Cole had worked with the postal reformer, Rowland Hill, on the introduction of universal penny postage and the famous Penny Black stamp. In 1843 he arranged for the design and printing of one thousand hand –coloured cards which he sold at the high price of 6d - about 3 cents in today’s currency but a lot of money at the time and well beyond the reach of most ordinary people. Slowly, however, the idea of sending a special greeting card at Christmas caught the imagination and by 1881 the Post Office thought it wise to issue its first “Post early for Christmas” message in order to cope with the additional mail volumes.

Early Christmas cards generally show Santa dressed in green in anticipation of the spring-time that would put an end to winter’s grip. His red costume originated later in the United States and spread back to Europe. Scenes of festivity and traditional Biblical motifs formed the most popular themes on cards but, with the increasing importance of the Post Office at Christmas time, card manufacturers would sometimes incorporate a postal image – a snow-covered pillar box for instance or children awaiting the arrival of the postman.


In days when letters were still the main form of communication between people, it was expected that postal staff would provide normal services on Christmas day. Occasionally, there was generosity on the part of the Post Office as an employer: eighty-odd years ago the Postmaster General conceded that an “official Christmas breakfast” might be funded out of official funds for staff engaged on the 4am duties on Christmas day. This concession, however, was experimental and was not repeated the following year! It was normal for local delivery staff to remain on duty until the final incoming mails had been received, even if they were late, and staff might not get home to their families until the evening. Pressure from staff eventually brought change and, for the first time, there was no Christmas day delivery in 1937.

As mail volumes grew, it became necessary to take on extra staff at Christmas and, in difficult economic times, applications for those Post Office jobs far exceeded the number of positions available. Although Christmas volumes have been affected by technological innovations and changing writing habits, An Post still takes on extra staff at Christmas in order to cope with the nearly 100 million additional items that pass through the postal system over the Christmas period.

In recent years a visit to the GPO at lunchtime during December has become a traditon for many Dubliners. This visit is not just to buy the Christmas Stamps but to listen to the wonderful Christmas Music provided by Noel Carroll and his trusty bunch of volunteer musicians.

Santa’s Letters
An Post has been helping Santa with his Christmas post for over 20 years. An Post’s Chief Elf, Feargal reminds children to get writing that ALL IMPORTANT letter to SANTA as early as possible.  Letters should be addressed to Santa Claus, North Pole.  Santa loves reading the colourful and creative letters he receives from children in Ireland and Chief Elf Feargal asks children to remember to write their name and address clearly so that Santa can reply. But don’t worry if letters are sent to Santa too late for a reply, he will still be visiting on Christmas Eve.

A bulletin about Letters to Santa for children in Ireland

Chief Elf, Feargal says be sure to write early. In your letter clearly write your name and address. Put your letter in an envelope and address it to: Santa Claus, North Pole. Don't forget to put a 60c stamp on the envelope. Santa's helpers in An Post will make sure you receive a personal reply from the great man himself, just before Christmas.

An Post Christmas fun for children
Here are five fun activities to enjoy during the Christmas season
-Colour your own Christmas card
-Christmas word search
-Spot the difference
-Christmas crossword
-Picture of Santa to colour in
Please click Christmas Fun


The last posting dates for Christmas to make sure your Christmas cards and parecels arrive on time can be found on the An Post Site. Please click An Post

For mail TO Ireland and Northern Ireland, please check with your local postal service.

Copy Source: An Post

 

Thu, Apr 20, 2017

Fungie, the Dolphin of Dingle Bay

The dolphin is one of Ireland’s most fascinating mammals and Fungie is the most famous. He is a fully- grown bottlenose who is 13 feet (4 meteres) long and weighs about 500 lbs or around one-quarter tonne.
Fungie was first noticed in 1984 when Paddy Ferriter, the Dingle Harbour lighthouse keeper, began watching a lone wild dolphin escort the town's fishing boats to and from port. 
Later that year, it became officially recorded that Fungie was a permanent resident of the entrance channel to Dingle and the self-appointed “pilot” of the fleet. 
Over the years Fungie has developed from a timid but inquisitive observer of the human visitors into a playful, though mischievous, companion.  From observation of marks on his body, it seems that he does 'interact' with other whales, dolphins or porpoises, proving perhaps he is neither hermit nor outcast from his own kind, but rather that he is simply content to spend most of his time in and around Dingle Bay.


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March 4, 2011
   
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